Anywhere Access from Control4 Makes Remote Home Control Simple

Have you ever had one of those days where you’re so overwhelmed with responsibilities, that you start to forget even the most basic parts of your daily routine? There’s nothing worse than accidentally leaving the lights on, leaving the air conditioning on full-blast, or forgetting to arm the security system. It might not seem like a big deal at first, but those electric bills will add up. Thanks to the new Anywhere Access Controls from Control4, you can easily power down your home, reset your thermostat, or arm your security system from anywhere that has a 3G/4G or Internet connection. The entire Control4 system is controlled by your smartphone or tablet. By simply downloading the Control4 MyHome™ app or by using a web browser, you can control your entire home with a few finger swipes. Beats running all around the house to hit all the “off” switches, right? The opportunities to better manage and secure your home are endless with the Control4 Anywhere Access system. Imagine how much extra time (and how much less stress) you’d have if you could do all of the following everyday tasks from your smartphone? Lock or unlock doors View live security camera footage Adjust the temperature of your home Close or open garage doors Turn ANY electronic device on or off Not to mention, you can get custom mobile alerts when any of those things happen. It’s the easiest, more reliable way to ensure your home is safe and under control at all times. Longtime Control4 user, Joe Hageman, describes it best: “With Anywhere Access, I can get that same level of home...

Using Home Technology to Save Money on Utility Bills

It might sound counterintuitive to think of technology as something that can save money on your utility costs. Technology is certainly wonderful and there are many ways to integrate it into your home for convenience and entertainment, however, it takes power to use utilities such as lighting, air conditioning, heat and more. The key to conserving energy no matter how many sub-systems you have is a home automation system. Automation not only makes life easier, it can actually save money on the myriad of costs associated with owning a home. Automation systems can cut utility costs in several ways such as timing when lights come on and off. You can trigger specific functions with a single button press on a control device or when something specific happens, such as a door opening. For instance, when the garage door closes, lights in the house automatically turn off. Automating all your sub-systems to ensure they are only on when being used will significantly cut your utility costs, far more than you might realize. Following are the most common systems to automate; however, if it’s electrical it can be integrated. Lighting Turn lights on and off at specific times of the day, such as sunrise and sunset. You can also have multiple timed events. For instance, your outside lights can go on and off around the movements of the sun, while your inside lights are programmed individually for different times of the day, even in specific parts of the house. Just program them to fit your habits, preventing lights from burning electricity all day and night. The installation of motion sensors detects...
Apple iPad Mini Literally has a World of Home Control Possibilities

Apple iPad Mini Literally has a World of Home Control Possibilities

Apple’s new iPad Mini, the newest worst-kept secret in the company’s history, has finally been officially announced. In comparison to its larger siblings, the Mini features a 7.9-inch screen, is a mere 7.2 mm thick, and weighs less than seven-tenths of a pound. But perhaps most importantly, it can be held in one hand, and costs a mere $329. And if you’re not already controlling your home from the palm of your hand, you really have no excuse left. Just as the original iPad made touchscreens commonplace in the home two years ago (has it really only been two years?) due to its features, apps, and yes it’s price, the iPad Mini’s reduced barrier to entry will almost certainly lead to a new boom in the proliferation of touchscreens in the home. Before the iPad, home touchscreens were generally only sold as part of much larger home automation systems. They were the remote control interfaces for advanced home theater, lighting, climate, and security control. And yes, they made it easy to see at a glance what was going on around the home, as well as activate sophisticated, complicated home control scenarios at the touch of a button, but at upwards of $1500 apiece, they were also a significant investment, especially when you consider that home control and monitoring (and maybe rudimentary web browsing) were all they could do. The iPad changed all of that, putting touchscreens in the hands of a much larger audience, who naturally wanted to control their lights and security and home entertainment systems, too. It still required a custom installer to configure all of the...